Good Design is Invisible

good_packaging_design_invisibleWhile driving recently, I was listening to an American MarketPlace podcast segment “The Unheralded Path to Success: Be Invisible” featuring the book “Invisibles – the Power of Anonymous Work in an Age of Relentless Self-Promotion” by David Zweig.

Invisibles in the Workplace

The book highlights the people with behind-the-scene roles in the workplace that are critical to the mission of an organization but do not seek recognition or rewards.  Zweig describes invisibles as “people who are highly skilled professionals whose work is critical to whatever endeavor ther’re a part of, but who go largely unnoticed by the public.”

Zweig noted in hise role as fact checker at Conde Nast, the better he did his job the more he disappeared.  He describes invisibles as “people who are highly skilled professionals whose work is critical to whatever endeavor they’re a part of, but who go largely unnoticed by the public.”

Think the role of anesthesiologist, instead of the surgeon.  The success of a major surgery rests in the hands of the surgeon.  However, during surgery the success or failure is largely influenced by the anesthesiologist.  Do patients remember the name of their surgeon or anesthesiologist?

Good Design is Invisible

Design when well done becomes invisible.

“Good design, when it’s done well, becomes invisible.  It’s only when it’s done poorly that we notice it.” – Jared Spool, researcher + Expert on User Interface

Apple co-founder, Steve Jobs understood the power of good design.  Much of Apple’s success can be attributed to elegant, simplistic design.  Steve Jobs also understood the power of packaging having his name listed on 19 patents for boxes and plastics cradles for the iPod and iPhone.

Packaging Engineers | Ultimate Invisibles

The role of packaging engineer also falls into the invisibles category.  As stated in a previous blog posting Footprints + Packaging | Leaving a Lasting Impression, well-designed packaging looks great, is easy to unpack, and results in minimal packaging waste.  Packaging is functioning at its best when not noticed.  Done right, the packaging engineer’s effort go largely unnoticed.

How do your customers veiw your packaging?  If you packaging is not “seen” by your customers and just works, reach out to your packaging team and thank them for their efforts. However, be forewarned that your invisible players might shy away from the spotlight and continue to do a job well done.

Cascadia Packaging Group delivers strategic consulting services and innovative solutions to our clients with a focus on sustainability.  We are not here to replace your packaging team but to support them.  How can we help your team deliver invisible solutions to your customers?

 

 

 

 

Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Blog, Branding, Marketing, Packaging, Sustainability

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*